Tag Archives: maze

10-Pack of Printable Mazes

mazeFor the past year the student newspaper of Stevens Institute of Technology, The Stute, has been publishing my weaving mazes. It’s been wonderful to see a project that started as a meditative daily practice move into print and I look forward to seeing them every Friday. I’ve put together ten of these mazes into a printable PDF. Have fun and get lost!

Download now



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The Lil’ Red Marble

redmarble-animated


After years working in Flash I’ve finally launched my first HTML5 game. It’s programmed in PuzzleScript and has been a blast to make. In keeping with my summer of mazes I went with a simple interactive maze where you guide a red marble through tunnels to find a golden ring. I designed the graphics using Edge Touch on my iPhone and translated it to PuzzleScript using Plain Text, also on my iPhone. I’m thrilled to be able to create an interactive game while sitting at the playground with my kids, working on a computer I can fit into my pocket.

Play it now!

Let’s Make Games: CD Jewel Case Maze


I found this project on the Bloesem Kids blog and it’s a wonderful way to recycle old CD jewel cases.

Before class I emptied out some old cases from boxes of CDs I had stored in the attic. I had to reject a few that had parental advisory stickers attached (doesn’t Prince’s Purple Rain seem kind of quaint these days?), as well as a few that were cracked. The Bloesem blog advises using Fimo dough to create small balls to navigate the maze but I used ball bearings instead. Luckily our local hardware store has a drawer with loose steel ball bearings for $.20 each. A diameter of 5/16″ was perfect; bigger than that and the ball would get stuck in the case, smaller and it would jump the sides of the maze.

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The Labyrinth in the Tube

Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian




In celebration of the 150th anniversary of the London Underground, artist Mark Wallinger was commissioned to create artwork for all 270 stations of the Tube. He developed a series of enamel painted labyrinths, bringing together many classic circular labyrinths into a common visual language of solid black and white, with a red “X” as a start and end point.

This video contains an interview with Wallinger as well as a glimpse of the production process.
A labyrinth differes from a maze in that there are no dead ends and there is just one way in and one way out. I have been exploring the form, drawing both labyrinths and mazes in sketchbooks over the past couple years. It is a relaxing meditative practice, and encourages seeing of the entire page as an overall space, with the path traveling across every inch of the page. It’s encouraging seeing this often disregarded art form taking center stage in a public space.